ferry;;sadhonker;;adams;;resident evil;;zero;;hd remaster;;horror;;survival;;capcom Ferry "Sadhonker" Adams

RESIDENT EVIL ZERO HD REMASTER

By Ferry "Sadhonker" Adams on January 19, 2016

Almost a year ago to the day, our very own Diana “DumeeGamer" Dumee wrote a review about the HD remaster of one of the best-loved horror games in history: Resident evil. Now, right on the verge of the 20th anniversary of the first Resident Evil game, lo and behold, it is I who is writing a review about a HD remaster of another installment in this awesome horror-survival series: Resident Evil Zero.

Originally launched on the Nintendo Gamecube in 2002, Resident Evil Zero serves as a prequel to the first game in the series. It tells the story of how things went wrong at an Umbrella research station and of the events that inevitably led to S.T.A.R.S’ Bravo team disappearance and the subsequent search and rescue mission of the now-famous Alpha team. This mission, as we all know by now, led us into the even more famous mansion where we experienced the horrors of Resident Evil for the very first time.

Now, before I continue rambling about this game, I first have a confession to make. I actually never played Resident Evil Zero before… I mean, come on! Me… the Resident Evil fanatic of DumeeGamer.com, finding a Resident Evil game I’ve never played before! What are the odds?! Of course, I knew this game existed, I just kinda forgot about it. So, after my initial shock, I pulled myself together, got a firm grip on my controller and got ready to delve in a (for me) completely new adventure.


In Resident Evil Zero, you start off as Rebecca Chambers, a member of the S.T.A.R.S. Bravo team. You and you team have been sent to research a series of strange murders in the Arklay Mountains, just outside of Raccoon City. Naturally, the helicopter they using to get there, crash-lands in a forest, right near a wrecked MP vehicle, only containing the two corpses of the MPs that were driving it, but without so much as a trace of their prisoner. Bravo team decides it isn’t in enough trouble as it is and splits up in order to find and capture the escaped convict. At this point, I’d like to take a step back here and consider the helicopter for a moment. Now, I don’t know a hell of a lot about aviation, but it seems to me that, if helicopters keep on crashing, it’s time to switch to another manufacturer… wouldn’t you agree? Whatever the case; while making her way through the forest, Rebecca stumbles upon a stranded Umbrella train, called the Ecliptic Express. Naturally, as any good horror-survival game protagonist would, she starts to investigate the train all by herself.

She won’t be alone for long, however! Yes, naturally she encounters a wide selection of undead beings, but she also encounters a very much not undead specimen, named Billy Coen. Billy is an ex marine and, incidentally, the escaped convicted murderer everybody is looking for. Billy, however, seems not very keen on killing her, so tells her to leave him alone. But wouldn’t you just know it?! Right at that moment, a mysterious young man uses some kind of leeches to attack the train, forcing Rebecca and Billy to work together if they want to have any hope of survival. This is where our real journey begins, as well as the point where Resident Evil Zero shows us one of its neatest tricks: the so-called partner-zapping system.

Because Billy and Rebecca need to work together, the good people at Capcom thought it would be nice if you could control them both. This basically means that, when you’re controlling one of the characters, the other one follows you and can automatically attack enemies, depending on the team settings you have chosen. You can choose to have the AI controlled partner wait on the spot or follow you around automatically. You can also choose to have him or her attack enemies automatically or not at all, leaving the task of protecting them with you. I must say, this system does have its charm and I like the extra dimension it brings to the game. You will need to use both characters to solve specific puzzles and some tasks can only be performed by one of the two characters. And the switching between the two characters is as easy as pressing a button… literally!


As soon as you start collecting items, you run into the same old problem you’ll encounter in most Resident Evil games: not enough storage space. Oh well, I’ll just look for a stash, just like in the original Resident Evil. Hmm, if I were a giant box, where would I be…? Well, I’ll tell you where I’m not; I’m nowhere to be found in this entire game! Apparently, the team that created Resident Evil Zero, aimed making this game even more of a challenge than its predecessor was. So they chucked the stash-boxes overboard and replaced it with an item-dropping system that enables you to drop any items almost anywhere you like. The only limit to this is the number of items the room you’re dropping stuff in can contain. Although this gives you the freedom to clean up your inventory at any given time, it does mean you’ll be backtracking quite a bit if you want to keep all your stuff relatively nearby. On the other hand; if, next to scaring the hell out of people, Resident Evil has always been about back-tracking in order to solve environment puzzles and whatnot, so it’s actually not that big of a problem. Quite on the contrary actually; it feels almost natural when playing a Resident Evil game.

I must say, I very much enjoyed playing Resident Evil Zero; one can rightly say that it’s a true Resident Evil game that can hold its own against other games in the series. Because of the partner-zapping system, it might even be a bit more challenging than some other specimens this series has on offer. The graphics are nicely polished, making Resident Evil Zero look better than it ever did before. Keep in mind, the original models and environments are all from 2002, so don’t expect graphics like featured in some of the big current gen titles, but damn, it still looks awesome! As last year’s Resident Evil HD remaster, the Resident evil Zero HD remaster will feature aforementioned updated graphics, widescreen support, an optional updated control scheme and brand new content. In this remaster, this new content comes in the form of one of the series most well-known antagonists: Albert Wesker. After you finish the game, you can start a new game in the so-called Wesker mode. This mode allows you to take on the game as the Resident Evil 5 incarnation of Albert Wesker, Uroboros abilities and all!


So, if you’re as excited as I am whenever you get the chance to play a Resident Evil game, get off your ass and pre-order your copy now! Well actually, please wait until you’ve finished reading my story first, and then go and pre-order it! And now for the really awesome news! Besides buying the digital version of Resident Evil Zero, you can also buy the Resident Evil Origins Collection; a physical game disc that contains both the HD remasters of Resident Evil Zero AND the original Resident Evil… HOW COOL IS THAT?! By the way, if you pre-order the Resident Evil Origins Collection, you’ll also receive alternate costumes for both Rebecca and Billy as an added bonus!

Aaaaand, we’re done… I would like to thank you for finishing this review and not immediately leave to pre-order this fantastic game! I had tons of fun plattering zombies all over the walls and solving puzzles along the way and I know that, if you’re into Resident Evil or survival horror as a whole, you’ll absolutely love this remaster. The fact that you can now get it as a collection together with the Resident Evil HD remaster just adds to the enormous amount of fun there is to be had with this incredibly cool game! So there it is, my proverbial two cents. If I might give you all one last piece of advice: Don’t think about it and just pre-order your copy here.


available on:

RESIDENT EVIL ZERO HD REMASTER
Capcom
January 19, 2016


available on:

RESIDENT EVIL ORIGINS COLLECTION
Capcom
January 19, 2016