TALES OF MONKEY ISLAND (iOS)

By Raymond "Mighty Pirate" Dumee on November 30, 2015

Raymond Dumee, the eldest brother of our very own Diana, has decided to make his contribution to the ever-expanding selection of game reviews, right here at DumeeGamer.com. With him being in international shipping, what better game to play then a tale of faraway places and swashbuckling adventure?

So, for all you Grog sipping SCUMM, Guybrush Threepwood, Elaine, LeChuck, the Voodoo lady and even Stan are back in the fifth instalment of the Monkey Island series: TellTale’s Tales of Monkey Island.


In my never-ending search for remakes of old games (sorry, I just love the era where I’m from and the games we played back then). When browsing the app-store, I encountered a Monkey Island game I had never heard of before: Tales of Monkey Island. This took me back to the time I was still going to school, a long… long time ago. After school, on an old prehistoric computer, I played ‘The Secret of Monkey Island’ and ‘Monkey Island Two: LeChuck’s Revenge’ for hours, but I never found out what that “secret” of Monkey Island actually was.

I never got to play The Curse of Monkey Island and Escape from Monkey Island, because our old computer couldn’t handle the games’ system requirements. So you can imagine that I was very pleased to find and play Tales of Monkey Island and finally see what became of that wannabe pirate, Guybrush Threepwood, and if that evil undead pirate LeChuck was still trying to marry Elaine against her will.

The first Chapter starts off with a battle on the high seas. Guybrush and Elaine are married now, but the evil pirate LeChuck hijacked Elaine’s ship and is practising voodoo on some poor monkeys for the usual purposes. Threepwood, armed with a spell given by the Voodoo Lady comes to stop LeChuck and rescue his beloved wife. According a good Monkey Island game Threepwood screw up in one way or another, this time by incorrectly mixing the ingredients for the Cursed Cutlass of Kaflu that he needs to kill LeChuck and accidentally infects the entire Caribbean with an evil pox in his clumsiness.


If that isn’t enough, Threepwood causes Elaine’s ship to explode and got separated from her again. Washed ashore on Flotsam Island, the game and Threepwood’s adventure begins. Pursued by a pirate hunter and an insane French doctor he needs to find a way to get his wife back and get the evil pox cured. Advised by the Voodoo Lady Threepwood starts a search for La Esponja Grande and even got help from somebody you wouldn’t expect help from. During his journey, Guybrush Threepwood (Mighty Pirate!) manages to get himself in all sorts of trouble and hilarious situations, both of which he usually causes himself.

Tales of Monkey Island, being a point and click adventure, plays very well on a tablet. This is to be expected, because what else is used more often to point at things than your finger? I rest my case! Walking around the islands or on your ship is simply done by swiping across the screen. The hint frequency can be set to how you like it. In my opinion, the standard setting is a bit too easy and rather annoying, as the hints pop up a bit too quickly. I mean, don’t get me wrong, I have nothing against hints, but I rather not have them popping up when I’m still just looking around for clues.


The first Monkey Island game: The Secret of Monkey Island, was released back in 1990. Being familiar with this game might make it more fun to play Tales of Monkey Island, because of the returning characters from earlier games and all the inside jokes. Nevertheless, even if you haven’t played any of the older Monkey Island games, Tales of Monkey Island is still hilarious and well worth your time and effort! It contains more than enough humour and has a decent story. This combination is guaranteed to bring you several hours of gaming fun. Tales of Monkey Island brought an old franchise back to life, and I can only hope there’s still more Monkey Island Mayhem heading in our direction!


available on:

TALES OF MONKEY ISLAND (iOS)
Telltale & Lucasarts
December 2010 - February 2012